Finish of the Tasting Room

So I received some amazing feedback from readers on what is important in a tasting room layout, and key attributes of the space.  It has proved very helpful in helping to construct a space that meets the desires or craft beer enthusiasts and also those who will be visiting our space.  However, the progress we have made has naturally led to another huge question:  What do you want in the finishing of the space?

Does an ultra modern space like 33 Acres go over well, or would you prefer a look and feel like Brassneck.  Are there other tasting rooms outside of Vancouver and BC that stick out for you?  Tell me what you would like to see?

  • Minimalistic/Stark
  • Traditional
  • Modern
  • Ornate
  • Made to feel like a bar
  • Left to feel like a warehouse
  • Repurposed materials

More than talking about our space, I would love to know what other restaurants, bars, and spaces in Vancouver you like.  Of course our space will have a personality of its own, but we are keen to know what direction you think we should go with the finish.  As always, thanks for the thought and the feedback.

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11 thoughts on “Finish of the Tasting Room

  1. mikescraftbeer

    I think personally 33 Acres tasting room is way to impersonal and almost bleak with al of its mono shade. If you are in a tiny location I like what Powell Street did with their space but any bigger it needs to be different. I think a mix between Brassneck and straight up warehouse would be quite interesting. Re-purposed materials with an industrial kinda motif would look cool. Especially where you are located :). Saying that I think my favourite tasting room of all time is I’m Portland at Cascade Brewing.

    Reply
  2. Darren

    I enjoy 33 Acres and Brassneck’s tasting rooms because they have a clear identity, style, and personality.IMO it works for them because they have stuck to a style and defined themselves by it. Personally I like the repurposed wood style at Brassneck rather than the echo-ing white walls of 33 Acres, but I can appreciate their commitment to a minimalist style. That being said, it probably doesn’t matter too much what your tasting room looks like as long as there is tasty beer and good people to drink it with!
    So I would suggest you choose what style you think defines your brewery best and finish accordingly. Cheers

    Reply
    1. locuswest Post author

      Hi Darren, I think you make a really good point regarding going with a style that reflects who we are. Agreed on the Brassneck use of their space and design. It was very well done.

      Reply
  3. beerscout

    33 Acres is more of a designer’s kind of space, I think it’s a good move to set them apart even if the beer crowd’s reaction is polarizing. The fact that each brewery has its own unique feel is a great part of the experience and I enjoy many of them. I think that working with the key features of the space will be a major part in deciding what does and doesn’t make sense – if you had things like exposed brick, I’d be all over making that a feature wall.

    I think if I were coming for a growler fill, an industrial styled space would be pretty cool. But if I’m going to hang out and have a pint of the latest cask creation, something a little more cozy and home-like would be nice. We don’t yet have a proper “brewery lounge” in Vancouver, do we? Couches, coffee tables, and the like? That’d be pretty cool. Maybe with funky artwork and a record player in the corner to really feel like your buddy’s dad’s basement in 1986.

    Easy PR points for featuring a rotating collection of local artist’s work (whether paintings, prints, sculptures etc) which can be procured to suit the vibe of the space.

    Reply
    1. locuswest Post author

      Hey Beerscout, awesome suggestions and I think that you make some really good points. Do you think a tasting room that feels like your parents basement would be a good thing … in other words, do you think the community would embrace that? I like the thought of it, but wonder how it would be received.

      Reply
  4. Ryan

    Totally agree with Cascade! I’m also a fan of Brassneck…

    Below i’ve listed pictures of a few spaces i’ve really enjoyed, hopefully they help:

    Great Divide
    http://www.austinpixels.com/2012/09/great-divide-brewery-denver-co/

    Avery Brewing

    Cascade Brewing
    http://beerlens.com/2012/01/05/cascade-brewing-barrel-house-portland-or/

    White Rabbit brewing

    Mornington Brewery
    http://www.visitmorningtonpeninsula.org/ThingsToDo/FoodWine/AllFoodWine/tabid/156/View/3520/Mornington-Peninsula-Brewery/Default.aspx

    Mountain Goat
    http://www.phooey.com.au/projects/76/mountain-goat-beer-hall
    http://www.broadsheet.com.au/melbourne/nightlife/directory/bar/mountain-goat-brewery

    Russian River
    http://brewbokeh.com/place-russianriver.html

    The Harp (regular pub)

    Reply
    1. locuswest Post author

      Hi Dave, your examples of brewery tasting rooms is awesome. I have not seen the inside of most of these, and they give us some great insight into what we can do with what we have. I think there are a lot of options. If you have any other ideas or thoughts, please pass them along. Thanks again for your thought and effort, it really helps.

      Reply
  5. CraftBeerChris

    I love the idea of couches and such — the parents basement theme is great. But if that’s the case, then your beer should reflect that theme. I completely agree that the tasting room should reflect the brand. So decide on your brand, then go from there. But I think couches would be amazing — no brewery in Vancouver has that. And the record player — brilliant! East Van hipsters would eat that up! (So would I)

    Reply
    1. locuswest Post author

      I also like the idea of having something informal and relaxed, but I am not sure our beer will reflect that? So what do we do then? I think we have to go with what our brand is turning out to be, which is all about the beer. You have given me some food for thought.

      Reply

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